Get Your Mitt Ready & Maple Syrup Out- Just Like Jackie – Review & Author Interview

There is a common phrase that many of us teach our children “You can’t judge a book by its cover”, but when it comes to books, it’s a different ball game. Book lovers, you know what I mean! How often do we pick up a novel based on the cover? This is exactly how we got introduced to Lindsey’s book Just Like Jackie. We saw the cover reveal on twitter and our jaws dropped. The illustration of a young girl and man in the cold snowy trees with just enough light poking through, we knew we had to read it! We were lucky enough to receive an ARC from a friend and we tapped right into it!

Lindsey has created this wonderful main character, Robinson. When we first meet her she is beating up a boy in school who called her a name. Robinson has a hard exterior, but as we get to know her we learn that she is dealing with so much inside and like many kids, is trying to do her best to survive each day. As we read the book our heart ached for Robinson, who lives with her grandfather, and begins to notice that he is often forgetting things and having a hard time finishing sentences. She tries so hard to keep it a secret because he is all the family she has. As we read it we were thinking how this book would really connect with many students, who outside of the school walls have so much going on in their home lives. It once again reminded us, as educators, that students have so many stories, many of which are never shared in classroom, but can effect their presence at school.  The book tackles themes of friendship, bullying, illness, loss of parent and more, the plot moved along well and we felt we got to grow with the characters. We hope you have a chance to read and get to know Robinson too. 

Lindsey was kind enough to answer 3 questions about the book and three questions about her.

3 ?s  about Just Like Jackie

What three words you would use to describe Just Like Jackie?




What was the process for creating this book with so many important themes?

Whenever I write for kids I think back to my own middle grade years and try to focus in and really remember the things that made me feel something intensely. JUST LIKE JACKIE was born of the moments I recall sitting with my grandpa, when he would forget the ends of his sentences and I wouldn’t know for how long I should wait to see if he remembered, or if I should finish his sentence for him, or just nod and pat his hand as if to tell him that everything was going to be OK. I felt uncomfortable and sad and I wished I could do something to help his memory get better. This experience and these emotions helped me develop Robbie’s tender side, her relationship with her own grandpa.

JUST LIKE JACKIE was also born from a feeling of rage when a neighborhood boy smashed a robins’ nest out of my backyard tree with his wiffle ball bat. I had been watching and waiting for those eggs to hatch into little birdies and when the blue shells splattered across my lawn my ten-year-old hands clenched and my fist connected with his face. This feeling helped me develop Robbie’s fiesty side, her anger with bully Alex Carter.

From these two seed emotions, I was able to build the rest of Robbie’s story.

Tell us about your experience with fixing cars and making maple syrup.

When I was growing up, my dad worked for Toyota and my favorite part about visiting the dealership was the service shop out back. I was always amazed by the mechanics who knew how to assess a problem, hoist a car up on lifts, and fix it. I liked their dirty hands and oil-smeared uniforms. Unlike Robbie, I have never actually fixed anything on car in my life, but have always been in awe of people who have that technical know-how.

Maple syrup is a different story. I definitely got my hands sticky with sap every sugaring season growing up in Vermont. My grandpa had a maple farm out in the woods with a thousand taps and holding tanks with old engines that would push the sap into the sugarhouse where we’d boil it down to our Stoddard family maple syrup. Like Robbie’s grandpa, mine also had Alzheimer’s, but out at his sugarhouse, flushing lines and chopping wood and boiling sap, he never missed a beat.  

3 ?s about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

I was a middle school English teacher in Washington Heights, NYC for ten years and LOVED it. It was very hard to leave the classroom, but at the time of this two-book deal with HarperCollins, I also had my first child and returning to the classroom seemed like it would be too much. It felt like a good time to focus on my writing career in a way that I hadn’t been able to in the past because teachers work full FULL time. My husband and I are expecting a second child in February and I’ve just finished a second book, and my brain is churning on a third, but I hope to return to education, in some way, in the near future.

Another dream of mine has always been to open an independent bookstore. I know it’s a lot of work and I’d have a lot to learn but I am SO HAPPY in bookstores.

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

On the adult side, SING, UNBURIED, SING by Jesmyn Ward. This book gutted me. I had to put it down several times just to breathe.

On the children’s side, BROWN GIRL DREAMING by Jacqueline Woodson. The story of her family is itself an incredible journey through American history, and her poetry both sings and pierces on every page. It’s unforgettable.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

Can I cheat and say my freezer? Because I’m never without at least one pint of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream. Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough, New York Super Fudge Chunk, Half Baked– I like the flavors with chunks, left on the counter until it’s just the right consistency, and eaten out of my Housing Works Bookstore mug. THAT, and a book, is my picture of comfort.  

Thank you Lindsey! To learn more about Lindsey, check out her website or follow her on twitter. 

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