The 11:11 Wish…An Interview With Kim Tomsic

We’ve all had those moments, when we’ve made a whimsical wish knowing that it won’t come true, but are secretly hope that it does anyway.  But what if on one of those days, the wish…does come true?  Kim Tomsic was kind enough to send us an advanced copy of The 11:11 Wish, and answer questions in our interview below.

In the book,Megan is having trouble fitting in as a new student in middle school from day one after she is “zapped” by a classmate as she arrives in the office.  A new student hazing of sorts, Megan needs to plan something exciting by the end of the day.  Feeling lost, the memory of a rhyme her grandmother once recited while wishing on a cat clock comes back to her as she notices the same type of clock in her classroom.  One wish leads to another and before she knows it, Megan is in way over her head!

The 11:11 Wish tells the timeless struggles of going through middle school, while taking on a modern, fanciful feel.  Middle grade readers will definitely be able to relate to the characters and picture themselves in the novel.  Read below to hear from Kim Tomsic.

3 Questions about The 11:11 Wish

Is Megan’s character based at all off of your middle school experience?  My father was in the military, so I spent much of my life as the new girl, which felt fine when I was younger, but not so fine when I moved from Texas to a new school in Arizona. Somewhat like Megan’s experience of moving two weeks after the start of her seventh-grade school year, my move happened three weeks after my freshman year of high school. Yep, school had already begun which made for one tough experience! Everyone already had their friend groups, and I spent my time worrying that I’d be sitting alone at lunch. I’m not sure why that felt like it would be the worst thing in the world, but the thought of everyone seeing me sit by myself felt humiliating. The funny thing is, now I can’t remember who I ate with during those first few months or why the idea of people seeing me eat alone mattered. I have no problem sitting by myself now, but that experience serves me today as a reminder to reach out to someone in case they feel awkward or alone.

The problems that Megan faced have been problems kids have faced in middle school for years and years.  What research did you need to do to make her experience authentic and realistic in current times?

My research came from having a front row seat to the inside skinny with my kids—I was a good listener when I carpooled my children and their friends to school, to soccer, to dance, to the mall, to lunch, to anywhere! Furthermore, I was an active volunteer at their school. My main character Megan has a “wenis” incident in the story; well, a “wenis” is something my son came home from school laughing about. He thought it was the funniest thing he’d ever heard. Megan’s worry that she might be dressed like a forest ranger—I swear I heard those very words from my daughter’s own lips.  Many of the funny moments in the story contain a kernel of real life.   

What was the inspiration for your book?  Do you personally own a cat clock?

When I grew up, my family had cats but never a cat clock. Oh, how I loved those clocks, especially the ticking-tocking eyes and moving tail, so fun and whimsical! The notion of saving my money and purchasing a cat clock didn’t even occur to me, because it felt untouchable, like an item too magical to own.

As an adult, my niece and my daughter loved to announce that it was time to wish whenever the clock (any clock) ticked to 11:11. That’s when the idea struck me—I needed to write a book about wishing at 11:11, and naturally the magic had to be leveled by the magical cat clock of my memories.

You’ll be happy to know that after I turned in my final edits for The 11:11 Wish, I made a special celebration purchase: One authentic black and white Kitty-Cat Clock!

3 Questions about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

I love this question and the possibilities that spring to mind. I think my answer changes every week. This week’s answer:  if I weren’t a writer, I’d study to become an illustrator!  I love to sketch and draw, and though I only have minimal skills, it’s satisfying to take out my colored pencils and watch a shape take life. I find it fascinating when I go to a conference and listen to an illustrator give a presentation about the artistic choices he or she made to produce magic in their art. Professional illustrators are true wizards and I’m awed by their craft.

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

I recently read an advance copy of a book releasing in June, 2018 called The Boy, The Boat, and the Beast by Samantha M. Clark. I found the book similar to Hatchet meets The Wizard of Oz. I can’t stop thinking about how it all comes together in the end.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

Hmmmm, probably my tangerine LaCroix—I don’t mind being bubbly!

 

Kim’s upcoming events…

THE 11:11 WISH Book Launch BOULDER!
 DATE:

Thursday, 22 February 2018

 TIME:

6:30 pm

 VENUE:

Boulder Bookstore, Pearl Street, Boulder, CO

Book Launch party! Please join me!
1107 Pearl Street, Boulder CO
The 11:11 Wish book launch party DENVER!
 DATE:

Saturday, 3 March 2018

 TIME:

1:30 pm

 VENUE:

BookBar Denver, 4280 Tennyson Street, Denver, CO

Please join me at BookBar for my Denver launch party of The 11:11 Wish!

When: March 3, 2018

Time: 1:30pm

Where: BookBar Denver, 4280 Tennyson Street, Denver CO

Tattered Cover Writing Workshop for Kids, So You Want to be a Writer! 11 Magical Tips to Make Your Writing Come Alive!
 DATE:

Saturday, 24 March 2018

 TIME:

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 VENUE:

Tattered Cover Bookstore, 2526 E Colfax Ave, Denver, CO 80206

Writing workshop for kids, ages 8-18 years old: So You Want to be a Writer! 11 Magical Tips to Make Your Writing Come Alive
nErDcampKS
 DATE:

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

 VENUE:

nErDcampKS

nErDcampKS 2018 Hesston, Kansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Storymamas review board books, picture books, chapter books and middle grade novels. The majority of the books we review on our site and social media are purchased from a bookstore or checked out from the library. However, at times when we receive Advanced Readers Copies of books from authors, illustrators, publishers, or publicists we will note that in our review of a book. We are not and have not been compensated for our reviews. For every review, all opinions are our own regardless of how we received the book.

One Smart Cookie…

Smart Cookie by one of our favorite middle grade authors, Elly Swartz, is yet another fantastic story of emotion, love, friendship and family. We don’t know how Elly does it but once again, just like in her book Finding Perfect, she made us fall in love. We fell in love with the story, the characters, her words, just everything. Elly has this amazing way of making sure that as the reader you experience and step into the lives of her characters. You get so engrossed and involved in their lives you feel you know them personally and become invested in their successes, hardships and their stories. Smart Cookie is all about Frankie finding her perfect family. Since her moms passing it’s just been her dad, her gram and her living at a B & B. She misses her mom tremendously and she wants to feel like a family again but doesn’t think that’s possible without finding a new mom. Throughout the story she realizes what a family really means.

We had another opportunity to interview Elly Swartz about Smart Cookie, as well as ask her some questions about herself.

3 ?s about Smart Cookie

What three words would you use to describe your book?

Family. Heart. Spunk. (And, if I can sneak in a fourth, Secrets.)

We love that you have multiple stories weaved together with multiple layers to the main character. Where did you come up with your ideas for Smart Cookie?  

Frankie’s story is all about family. For me, family is at the heart of everything I do and everything I am. I grew up with a very close family. But when I was thirty, my mom died. She was 55. Her loss opened a great big hole in my heart. And after 22 years, I’ve realized some holes aren’t meant to be filled. Not in the same way. And that is ultimately what Frankie learns. Family isn’t about having all the same pieces in place, it’s about having people in your life who love you unconditionally. And that circle is so much bigger than those with whom you shared a bedroom, a childhood, a name.

Frankie’s friend Elliot’s ghost hunting was sparked by my youngest son and one of his childhood friends. When they were eleven (now 22), they went ghost hunting, and, as the story goes, they found a ghost!

Frankie’s snow globe collection was inspired by my oldest son. He collected snow globes when he was little. When I was writing this story, I found the box marked ‘snow globes’ and shared them with Frankie. She loved them!

And Frankie’s pets, Lucy and Winston, came to the page right from my home. Lucy, my beagle, is all spunk and love. Just like Frankie. And, Winston, was inspired by my youngest son’s African Pygmy Hedgehog named Hippie.

So while it wasn’t the plan going in, seems there’s a lot of my life tucked into these pages.

Do you have any “Frankies” in your life?  Is she based off of anyone you know?

Frankie is a blend of many people in my life. I think she’s equal parts spunk and heart. I love her courage, wit, strength, and strong sense of caring for those she loves the most. Gratefully, there are many strong girls and women in my life who share these qualities.

3 ?s about You

What is your “go-to” kidlit book to give as a gift and why?

I have a few. I love Happy Dreamer by Peter Reynolds, I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. And, I Love You, Stinky Face by Lisa McCourt and Cyd Moore. New to this list are Love by Matt de la Pena and Loren Long and Be Kind Pat Zietlow Miller and Jen Hill (out 2/6). All of these books are filled with heart. Not sure there could be a better gift to give.

If you could have a dinner party with three people (dead or alive), who would you invite and why?

My three guests would be my mom, Judy Blume, and Michelle Obama. Three incredible, strong women.

My mom has been gone for twenty-two years. There is not a day that passes that I don’t wish to have one moment with her. To tell her I love her. To say thank you. To listen.  

Judy Blume, well, she’s one of my writer heroes. I want to know how it felt when Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret? came out. What she’s reading. The advice she’d give. And, what she learned along the way.

Michelle Obama, she truly embraces the strength and intelligence, kindness and empathy, and sense of family that I so admire. I’d love to hear what’s important to her now, what matters most, and what is in her TBR pile. Then we could go to the gym together and work-out.

Honestly, three amazing women who I would love to learn from and be inspired by over a glass of wine and dinner. 

What has been your most memorable “author” moment since Finding Perfect has been released?

There have been many wonderful author moments, but the one that resonates most, was a letter from a student who I’d connected with. This letter began, “I just wanted you to know that you changed my life.” Honestly, that moment melted my heart and has stayed with me. To know the words I wrote, the story I told, made a difference is truly everything.  

And a few extras…

Smart Cookie Activity and Curriculum Guide

http://ellyswartz.com/smart-cookie-book

Links to order Smart Cookie:

http://amzn.to/2v0pWU9

http://bit.ly/2uRCWL1

http://bit.ly/2vT5YXJ

Once again, thank you so much Elly for answering our questions and sharing such powerful stories with the world! To learn more about Elly, check out her website or follow her Instagram and  twitter.

Keep an eye out for her third book, Give and Take in 2019!

Elly Swartz loves writing for kids, Twizzlers, and anything with her family. Her debut novel, FINDING PERFECT (FSG 2016) is about twelve-year-old Molly, friendship, family, OCD, and a slam poetry competition that will determine everything. In her second book, SMART COOKIE (Scholastic, 2018), you meet the spunky and big-hearted Frankie. Frankie’s all about family with a dash of mischief and mystery! And then in 2019, say hello to Maggie in GIVE AND TAKE (FSG). Elly lives in Massachusetts with her family and beagle named Lucy. If you want to connect with Elly, you can find her at ellyswartz.com, on Twitter @ellyswartz or on Instagram @ellyswartzbooks.

The Unintentional Adventures are Anything but Bland!

 

Image Copyright Jen Hill

Calling all quirky book lovers!  The witty writing style of Kara LeReau will have you entertained from start to finish.  The Unintentional Adventures of the Bland Sisters is a series based on Jaundice and Kale Bland, two sisters who would rather be darning their neighbors’ socks and eating cheese sandwiches, but instead find themselves on face-paced, dangerous adventures.  When their parents left on an errand years ago, the sisters never expected to find out that they were galavanting around the world on high-stakes missions, nor do they have any plans to join them.  But life doesn’t always go as planned, and Jaundice and Kale find themselves in the midst of the action.  Join them on their adventures in The Jolly Regina and The Uncanny Express.

We had the chance to talk with Kara LaReau about The Unintentional Adventures, as well as ask her some questions about herself.

3 ?s about The Unintentional Adventures of the Bland Sisters: The Uncanny Express

 

What are three words you would use to describe your book?

Magic, mystery, marshmallow.

What can fans of The Jolly Regina expect from this new Bland Sisters unintentional adventure?

Similar to The Jolly Regina, you’ll find a lot of humor and subversions of adventure tropes (this time, it’s Agatha Christie mysteries, particularly Murder on the Orient Express) and traditional gender roles. Also, there’s a bit of a twist at the end, so hang on, folks!

Were there any other character names in the running before you settled on Jaundice and Kale?

Never. That was a case of exactly the right names coming to me at exactly the right time!

3 ?s about Kara LaReau

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

Probably something to do with cooking and baking, my other passions. When I’m feeling really insecure about my writing, I fantasize about quitting and opening a B&B.

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

Lately it’s The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street by Karina Van Glaser, which continues to warm my heart, even in this snowpocalyptic winter.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

A bottle of Champagne — bubbly and fun at parties.

Giveaway!

There are several ways to enter the giveaway! The winner will receive both books signed by Kara and an awesome bland swag pack!

Here are the different ways to enter:

-Comment below

Or

-On Instagram -tag a friend or repost our post about these books

Or

-On twitter -follow us, like and retweet our tweet about this blog!

Each will earn one entry! Good Luck!

Thank You, Kara, for allowing us on the Uncanny Express Blog Tour!

Kara LeReau

Kara LaReau was born and raised in Connecticut. She received her Masters
in Fine Arts in Writing, Literature, and Publishing from Emerson College
in Boston, Massachusetts and later worked as an editor at Candlewick
Press and at Scholastic Press. She is the author of picture books such
as UGLY FISH, illustrated by Scott Magoon, and NO SLURPING, NO
BURPING! A Tale of Table Manners, illustrated by Lorelay Bové; an
award-winning chapter book series called The Infamous Ratsos, illustrated
by Matt Myers; and a middle-grade trilogy called The Unintentional
Adventures of the Bland Sisters, illustrated by Jen Hill.  Kara lives in
Providence, Rhode Island with her husband and son and their cat.

To learn even more about Kara, please visit her website. Or follow her on Instragram and Twitter. 

Voices From The Underground Railroad


Happy Book Birthday to Voices From The Underground Railroad from Kay Winters and illustrator, Larry Day.  I met Larry last year, along with his writer wife, Miriam Busch, at a book signing at Second Star To The Right Bookstore.  We chatted about their work and how I was involved in a kidlit enthusiast group called Storymamas. They both were kind enough to follow us on social media. Larry began tagging Storymamas while in the process of drawing this book. We loved every sketch, draft and drawing he showed. We knew that as the publishing date got closer, we wanted to help spread the word about this wonderful book. The final copy of the book is magnificent. The colors, details, and facial expressions Larry has created is spectacular.  Kay writes this book using several points of view. The two main voices are, Jeb and Mattie, who are escaping slavery to seek freedom through the underground railroad. Kay’s text is so powerful and the pictures Larry has drawn make you feel all the emotions these characters are going through. It is a fabulous book to teach readers about the historical events during this time. We hope you will add it to your home, school, or classroom libraries.

Here is the book trailer! Check it out!

Larry was also kind enough to answer 3 questions about the book and 3 questions about himself.

3 ?s  about Voices From the Underground Railroad

What are three words you’d use to describe this book?

Escape. Running. Freedom.

The colors, the facial expressions, and details on the page are truly spectacular. What was the process for getting each page the way you wanted it?

What a good question!

Normally, I draw expressions without thinking. Detail comes naturally. Expressions come from a respectful appreciation of the subject.

What was the collaboration like with Kay? Did she see your drawings through the draft phase? Did she send you information on what she envisioned?

I always share with authors. There are times when an author’s information is crucial to the visual story.  One never knows.

3 ?s about You

If you weren’t an illustrator, what would you want to be and why?

Another great question!

Sometimes. I think about losing the capability to draw.

If that happened, I would write.

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

How about four, instead:

Milo’s Hat Trick, Jon Agee.

Alfie, by Thyra Heder

Bone Dog, by Eric Rohmann

Lion, Lion, by Miriam Busch

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

Blueberries!

Thank you Larry for chatting with Storymamas. We are excited about all your upcoming projects, including a collaboration with Jerry Spinelli, publishing by Holiday House in 2019!

To learn more about Larry feel free to visit his website or follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

All Three Stooges -Erica Perl’s Newest Book & Interview

Erica Perl’s newest book All Three Stooges enters the world tomorrow.  I had the pleasure of having the ARC and reading it a few weeks ago. For the past several years, I think that middle grade/young adult authors have done such a wonderful job dealing with difficult issues so many kids are exposed to in their daily lives, ones that occur personally or that they might see on the news or social media. This book is no exception. All Three Stooges is told from the perspective of a boy named Noah. Noah loves hanging out with his best friend, Dash and Dash’s father. While hanging out together the three of them would perform and watch comedy bits together.  Unfortunately, Dash’s dad dies suddenly and Noah has a difficult time dealing with his death. Throughout the book Noah is not only mourning the loss of Dash’s dad, but Dash has shut Noah out of his life.  For Noah, someone who loves comedy and entertaining others with his jokes, he finds it difficult to navigate his life without his best friend. In an honest way, Noah desperately wants his best friend back, and it leads to many poor decisions and having to really think about what is important in his life.  With such a heavy theme, Erica has done a good job of weaving humor and pop culture references, which adds a good sense of lightness to the book.  Also, within the book, Erica, educates the reader about the Three Stooges and other famous comedians. Within the first page it asks you to google the Three Stooges scene “seltzer fight three little pigskins.” (You should, it is pretty funny). After I finished the book I wrote Erica and told her I felt the book was heavy, emotional, funny, and made me think. There are probably so many students who loose a loved one in middle school and don’t know how to navigate their feelings. I know this book will touch the lives of many who read it.

Thank you Erica for writing a book that deals with such a touchy topic in an enjoyable and heartfelt way. Erica was also kind enough to answer three questions about the book and three questions about her.

3 ?s  about All Three Stooges

What are three words you would use to describe your book?

Three words? That’s hard for someone as word-y as me, but I’ll try. First is loss, both because Dash loses his dad and Noah loses his best friend. The second word is longing, because Noah spend a lot of time wishing things could go back to the way they were (when Dash’s dad was alive and Dash was still speaking to him), and this motivates him to make some pretty bad choices. The third word is laughter. This is because it what cemented the friendship of Noah and Dash in the first place (their love of comedy), and because it is what keeps us going even in the toughest of times.

What is one skit/sketch mentioned in the book that you would tell readers to google immediately and watch?

I love Adam Sandler’s Hanukkah song, which is in the book and is the basis for the title of the book. There are several versions out there, I should note, so here’s the one I’d suggest: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KX5Z-HpHH9g (“All Three Stooges” is mentioned at 2:41)

In your author’s notes, you mentioned you wanted to tell this story from Noah’s perspective, had you ever drafted or considered from another point of view?

Noah’s voice was the one that was in my head, and it helped me really focus on the ripple effect of a tragedy. I think this perspective also felt the closest to my own, since I have lost a friend to suicide and I am close to several people who have lost immediate family members to suicide.

3 ?s about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

There are a lot of other things I like to do – dance, run, play with my kids and my dogs, bake pies, sing, and ski – but so far I’m not aware of any opportunities to become a singing, skiing, pie-baker. For this reason, I’m planning to stick with writing books!

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

One of my favorite books is Roald Dahl’s DANNY THE CHAMPION OF THE WORLD. I didn’t consciously connect that book with ALL THREE STOOGES while I was writing it, but I think the way in which Danny worships his dad (but doesn’t know his secrets) is not unlike how Noah views Dash’s father, Gil.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

I wish I could say “seltzer!” because it plays an important role in this book, but the truth is: I’m trying to stop drinking carbonated beverages. I used to drink it every day but now I only have seltzer every once in a while, so it is not in my fridge. One of my favorite things, though, that IS in my fridge is a jar of capers. Tiny, pickled, salty little capers – yum! What do they tell you about me? That I love things that seem cute but pack a big punch. Like capers and hedgehogs (note: I don’t eat hedgehogs, or keep them in my fridge).

Thank you Erica ! To learn more about Erica and all her other wonderful books, check out her website or follow her Instagram and  twitter. 

 

Get Your Mitt Ready & Maple Syrup Out- Just Like Jackie – Review & Author Interview


There is a common phrase that many of us teach our children “You can’t judge a book by its cover”, but when it comes to books, it’s a different ball game. Book lovers, you know what I mean! How often do we pick up a novel based on the cover? This is exactly how we got introduced to Lindsey’s book Just Like Jackie. We saw the cover reveal on twitter and our jaws dropped. The illustration of a young girl and man in the cold snowy trees with just enough light poking through, we knew we had to read it! We were lucky enough to receive an ARC from a friend and we tapped right into it!

Lindsey has created this wonderful main character, Robinson. When we first meet her she is beating up a boy in school who called her a name. Robinson has a hard exterior, but as we get to know her we learn that she is dealing with so much inside and like many kids, is trying to do her best to survive each day. As we read the book our heart ached for Robinson, who lives with her grandfather, and begins to notice that he is often forgetting things and having a hard time finishing sentences. She tries so hard to keep it a secret because he is all the family she has. As we read it we were thinking how this book would really connect with many students, who outside of the school walls have so much going on in their home lives. It once again reminded us, as educators, that students have so many stories, many of which are never shared in classroom, but can effect their presence at school.  The book tackles themes of friendship, bullying, illness, loss of parent and more, the plot moved along well and we felt we got to grow with the characters. We hope you have a chance to read and get to know Robinson too. 

Lindsey was kind enough to answer 3 questions about the book and three questions about her.

3 ?s  about Just Like Jackie

What three words you would use to describe Just Like Jackie?

Honest

Inclusive

Intimate

What was the process for creating this book with so many important themes?

Whenever I write for kids I think back to my own middle grade years and try to focus in and really remember the things that made me feel something intensely. JUST LIKE JACKIE was born of the moments I recall sitting with my grandpa, when he would forget the ends of his sentences and I wouldn’t know for how long I should wait to see if he remembered, or if I should finish his sentence for him, or just nod and pat his hand as if to tell him that everything was going to be OK. I felt uncomfortable and sad and I wished I could do something to help his memory get better. This experience and these emotions helped me develop Robbie’s tender side, her relationship with her own grandpa.

JUST LIKE JACKIE was also born from a feeling of rage when a neighborhood boy smashed a robins’ nest out of my backyard tree with his wiffle ball bat. I had been watching and waiting for those eggs to hatch into little birdies and when the blue shells splattered across my lawn my ten-year-old hands clenched and my fist connected with his face. This feeling helped me develop Robbie’s fiesty side, her anger with bully Alex Carter.

From these two seed emotions, I was able to build the rest of Robbie’s story.

Tell us about your experience with fixing cars and making maple syrup.

When I was growing up, my dad worked for Toyota and my favorite part about visiting the dealership was the service shop out back. I was always amazed by the mechanics who knew how to assess a problem, hoist a car up on lifts, and fix it. I liked their dirty hands and oil-smeared uniforms. Unlike Robbie, I have never actually fixed anything on car in my life, but have always been in awe of people who have that technical know-how.

Maple syrup is a different story. I definitely got my hands sticky with sap every sugaring season growing up in Vermont. My grandpa had a maple farm out in the woods with a thousand taps and holding tanks with old engines that would push the sap into the sugarhouse where we’d boil it down to our Stoddard family maple syrup. Like Robbie’s grandpa, mine also had Alzheimer’s, but out at his sugarhouse, flushing lines and chopping wood and boiling sap, he never missed a beat.  

3 ?s about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

I was a middle school English teacher in Washington Heights, NYC for ten years and LOVED it. It was very hard to leave the classroom, but at the time of this two-book deal with HarperCollins, I also had my first child and returning to the classroom seemed like it would be too much. It felt like a good time to focus on my writing career in a way that I hadn’t been able to in the past because teachers work full FULL time. My husband and I are expecting a second child in February and I’ve just finished a second book, and my brain is churning on a third, but I hope to return to education, in some way, in the near future.

Another dream of mine has always been to open an independent bookstore. I know it’s a lot of work and I’d have a lot to learn but I am SO HAPPY in bookstores.

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

On the adult side, SING, UNBURIED, SING by Jesmyn Ward. This book gutted me. I had to put it down several times just to breathe.

On the children’s side, BROWN GIRL DREAMING by Jacqueline Woodson. The story of her family is itself an incredible journey through American history, and her poetry both sings and pierces on every page. It’s unforgettable.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

Can I cheat and say my freezer? Because I’m never without at least one pint of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream. Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough, New York Super Fudge Chunk, Half Baked– I like the flavors with chunks, left on the counter until it’s just the right consistency, and eaten out of my Housing Works Bookstore mug. THAT, and a book, is my picture of comfort.  

Thank you Lindsey! To learn more about Lindsey, check out her website or follow her on twitter. 

Kid Review: Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race

Hannah, our guest blogger,  brings us today’s #middlegrademonday recommendation. Below is her review of Chris Grabenstein‘s Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race:

The book Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race by Chris Grabenstein is the 3rd book in the Mr. Lemoncello series. It was a good book, but some parts of it might be hard to understand if you haven’t read the other 2 books. I was able to make many predictions that were close to accurate, but there was a big twist in the end. When I met the author, I realized that he was a lot like his character, Mr. Lemoncello.

If you like puzzles, games, and reading, this is a book you should read.

 

Hannah is currently a 5th grader, but was in my class as a third grader. When she was in my class she loved getting my recommendations of books to read. She only read one book at a time and put others on her “shelfie” (phrase we call our mental shelf of books we want to read).  Hannah loved our #bookmadness16 tournament, reading all the nominated books (caught in the act on the tweet below). She often used our class twitter account to report out the winners of each round or to tweet to the nominated authors! 

 

   

I am so happy Hannah and I still keep in touch and talk about books. And I appreciate her taking the time to give us a kid review of a book (series) we have enjoyed!

 

Hannah is a 5th grade student who loves to read, dance, ski, and hike. She is a great big sister and loves sleep away camp.

 

 

World Kindness- #middleschoolpicturebook

Last year I wrote a post about how I use Thank You Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco in my classroom for a special Thanksgiving activity. Please take the time to read that post here. 

Today is also World Kindness Day and although I am currently staying home with my two boys for the year and don’t have a class to do this activity with, I decided to become my own student and show kindness to an old teacher. Last night I reread the book and then wrote a thank you letter to an old teacher in my life. I picked a woman who was my cooperating teacher for my student teaching in 2001! I have been in contact with her off and on through the years and decided I wanted her to be the recipient of a letter from me. I hope I hear back from her. Please keep your fingers crossed with me.

Another reason I want bring this book up is because I want to reiterate how important picture books can be for all ages. Right now there is a movement called #classroombookaday, which has many elementary, middle and even high school classes taking the time each day to read a picture book. I feel this book is the perfect #picturebooksformiddleschool! Published in 2012, it is a heart warming story about a bright girl, who has difficulty reading, finds comfort in drawing, and in 5th grade finally meets a teacher who helps her become a reader. Every time I read it I get tears in my eyes when she reencounters her teacher at the end. This is a great time to read it aloud in your classroom and have the students give thanks to the many teachers who have helped shaped who they are.

Please leave a comment on how you’ve used this book or any other “giving thanks” favorites!

 

Vilonia Beebe Takes Charge – The Story of A Girl You’d Want to Know

Vilonia Beebe Takes Charge by: Kristin L. Gray

I met Vilonia on a beautiful summer morning before my kids were awake. Drinking coffee I began the book. I learned quickly that like myself, Vilonia was a leftie, which had her playing first base in baseball and she was now going to try out pitching. Even though I’m an adult, making connections with characters draws you into a story, and from page two I was hoping my boys wouldn’t wake up for awhile so I could learn more about her.

I learned from reading the book that Vilonia is a true friend. She is loyal to everything she meets.  I say everything, because you need to read it to hear what happened with the goldfish 🙂 She is committed to her family, although her mom is having a tough time since her mother passed away and Vilonia is trying desperately to keep the family together. Her dedication and kind heart shine through in the whole story and you only wish Vilonia would be your friend, too!

Kristin’s story has many fun moments where you want to be in on the action, while other parts speak to you about how hard it is to loose people you love.

Kristin was kind enough to answer 3 questions about the book and three questions about herself! Enjoy and don’t forget to get your copy of Vilonia Beebe Takes Charge today!

Three Questions about Vilonia Beebe Takes Charge

Tell us more about how you came up with the unique name of Vilonia Beebe.

Great question! Vilonia and Beebe are two towns in Central Arkansas, near the city of Little Rock (where I grew up).

Were there parts that are based on real life events? (Without giving us any spoilers).

Yes! I’m a preemie, like Vilonia! So the first page is my birth story. I weighed two pounds at birth. Also, my dad, like Vilonia’s, is a fisherman. (I do wish I had Leon and Vilonia’s treehouse, though.)

In the acknowledgments you said – to Jesse who told me to “write this book already”.  How long was the journey to writing Vilonia’s story?

Vilonia’s story took me a whole year to write. Then, I spent another year in revision with my agent and editor. Then many months of waiting before she actually appeared in stores and libraries as a real book.

Three Questions about you

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

Possibly an artist or illustrator. As a kid, I was always drawing. I’d give anything to be able to sketch or paint whatever I wished. Hmm. I also like cupcakes a lot. So being a baker would be fun. But I wouldn’t want the pressure of baking a wedding cake! Oh! I know. Maybe a scientist or archivist? I love research and random facts.

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

I just finished Claire Legrand’s SOME KIND OF HAPPINESS (2016). It is a wondrous, magical tale of family, secrets, adventure, and bravely speaking truth.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

So, let’s keep this between us, but I hide mini dark chocolate peanut butter cups in my refrigerator so my family won’t eat them all. Ha!

Thank you for having me. I love the Storymamas!

To learn more about Kristin visit her website or you can also find her on Instagram or Twitter.

Open If You Dare-Interview with Dana Middleton

If you’ve been following our blog for awhile, you’ve read about Dana Middleton’s first book, The Infinity Year of Avalon James (and if not take a look at the link). Even though Open If You Dare takes on a whole different genre it was just as good and couldn’t keep us from turning the pages. Dana graciously agreed to another interview with us and once again after the interview we decided that yes, in fact, we want to be friends with Dana and the characters she writes. Open If You Dare comes out tomorrow so pre-order today so you can read this awesome mystery, the perfect fall book!

3 ?s about Open If You Dare

What three words would you use to describe your book?

Mysterious, suspenseful, nostalgic. Not that nostalgia even exists for my target readers, but it was nostalgic for me.

Which character do you relate most to Birdie, Ally or Rose and why?

I relate most to Birdie, some to Ally, and not at all to Rose! Birdie is most like me. We like mysteries, we’re weirdly brave sometimes, and also sometimes selfish. And we’re very loyal friends. I played fast pitch softball so I was a little bit of a jock like Ally but definitely not as tough. Rose is an alien life-form to me. I have no idea where she came from and I think I’d be a little scared of her if we met in person!

This book is a mystery, was your writing process different than when you wrote The Infinity Year of Avalon James?

Yes! Because it was a mystery how it was going to happen! And I mean that on many levels. First, I wrote The Infinity Year of Avalon James without the pressure of a publisher waiting for it. Open If You Dare was different because I’d never written on a deadline before. I figured out quite quickly that I had to show up to the page almost every day or I might fail completely and never do it. Also, I’d never written a mystery before (and it turned into quite a strange mystery) so I hope readers will go down that path with me. Afterwards, I swore I’d never try a mystery again but lately, I’ve begun to think it might be fun to attempt another one. Funny how time lets us see things differently!

3 ?s about You

What is your “go-to” kidlit book to give as a gift and why?

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead. I love time travel. I love mystery. I love strong girl characters. This book is challenging to the reader and it’s real in a way that makes you want to read it again and again.

Now that you’ve written a mystery and realistic fiction/fantasy (depending on the reader) books, is there another book genre you’d like to explore and possibly write next?

I’m working on that other book now. It’s steeped heavily in the realistic fantasy camp. And I’ve got a science fiction story up my sleeve that might come after that.

What does your workspace look like? 

My work space is everywhere. I share an office with my husband but I rarely write there. I’m often at our dining room table or at a local coffee shop tapping away among other writers. That’s one thing I love about writing. I can do it anywhere!

Thank you Dana for taking the time to answer our questions! To learn more about Dana Middleton visit her website.  Or follow her on Twitter and Instagram.