Abby Cooper Talks About Her Babies

3 Question’s about Sticks & Stones

What three words would you use to describe Sticks and Stones?
Quirky, magical fun!

How did you come up with the disease cognadjivisibilitis?
It took a lot of thinking and a LOT of revision! I knew I wanted to explore what it would be like if a character had words on her body. But that can’t just randomly happen – there needs to be some sort of explanation. I thought a skin disorder seemed like the most natural cause. From there, I brainstormed the longest, most complicated-sounding name I could think of (because most real disorders have them), came up with symptoms, causes, treatments, etc., and cognadjivisibilitis was born.

What do you want readers to leave your book thinking?
I wrote this book to remind readers how important it is to be kind to others, and how important it is to be kind to themselves. Developing positive self-esteem can be a major challenge for kids (and grown-ups!) I hope Sticks & Stones helps readers appreciate all the wonderful, unique qualities that make them who they are.

3 Question’s about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?
I was a school librarian before I was an author, and that was the best job in the world (besides this one, of course!) I would happily do any job that allowed me to work with kids and books. I would also love to be a professional cupcake baker, though that’s more of a fantasy as I have very few kitchen-related skills. (Maybe I could be a professional cupcake taste-tester instead. Is that a thing?)

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

Frindle by Andrew Clements is my all-time favorite book, and it has been ever since my third grade teacher, Mrs. Huntley, read it to my class. There was just something about it, and whatever that something was, it inspired me to read like I had never read before. It’s interesting, because I’ve gone back to re-read it several times over the years, and each time I discover something new or take away something different. I love that books can do that.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?
I’m kind of a dessert-o-holic. It’s bad. And yet so good. I currently have a giant Ziploc in my fridge filled with cookies, brownies, fudge, so on and so forth. Besides the fact that I’m obsessed with dessert,  I guess this would also tell you that I am strange (in a good way, obviously) and like to think outside the box. I’m pretty sure most people don’t keep these things in the fridge. I’ve arbitrarily decided that doing so will somehow make them last longer, even though desserts never last long around here regardless of where they’re stored.

BONUS QUESTIONS:

What can fans of Sticks & Stones expect from Bubbles?
Bubbles is similar to Sticks & Stones in that it falls in the magical realism genre; it’s a realistic novel except for one magical element, something you typically wouldn’t see happening in our world. In Bubbles, you’ll find another tween girl experiencing something very unusual. Like Elyse in Sticks & Stones, Sophie must navigate her magical challenge and the ways it impacts her relationships. I hope readers will enjoy Bubbles as much as I enjoyed writing it!

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Follow Abby Cooper on Facebook, Twitter, & Instagram. Also, check out her website to learn more about her.

An Interview with Bridget Hodder author of The Rat Prince

 

 

3 ?s about The Rat Prince

What three words would you use to describe your book?

Magic, adventure, and surprises!

Did you research rat/mice behavior before writing the book?

Yes! I read all about rats’ super-strength, super-stealth, and super-intelligence, to the point where I scared myself. Fortunately, Prince Char and the rodent inhabitants of the Northern Rat Realm use their powers for good.

How many versions did you write? How did you decide which parts of the original fairytale to keep and which ones to omit?

Lady Rose and Prince Char’s story came to me fully developed, as a lightning bolt of inspiration. When the book went to my editor, she told me that most books go through 3 or 4 revisions before it’s finalized…and of course, that’s how it happened!

I tried to maintain the traditional framework of the fairy tale, while leaving out or modifying elements I found problematic. For example, I was never comfortable with how the original story emphasized Cinderella’s physical beauty as her most outstanding characteristic. So my story turns this idea around, and takes it to the extreme: what constitutes true beauty? Is it something on the outside, or on the inside? Can something (or a little furry someone) we’ve ignored, or even reviled, actually turn out to be a thing of great beauty?

 

3 ?s about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

In a way, that question’s already been answered– I’ve been an archaeologist and an autism therapist, among other things–if only I could do all of them at once! But since you’re giving me the opportunity to make a wish, here it is: I’d love to be an Angel Investor in all kinds of awesome startup companies that would go on to make the world a better, healthier, happier place!

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

Ooooh, this is a terribly hard one. I can’t choose! There are so many books that qualify. Classics like A LITTLE PRINCESS by Frances Hodgson Burnett, A WRINKLE IN TIME by Madeleine L’Engle, and THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER by CS Lewis were important to me as a child. Recently, for adults, the biography of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon called ROMANTIC OUTLAWS held me spellbound for weeks; as did the gorgeously written adult-level lit fic by Anna Solomon, LEAVING LUCY PEAR. I’m also looking forward to a bunch of 2017 Middle Grade and YA debuts!!

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

About six pints of blueberries and strawberries, with another pint of whipping cream. Let the summer begin!

 

Follow Bridget Hodder on Twitter and check out her website to learn more about her.

#storymamassummerselections

Check out our @storymamas Instagram and Twitter feeds for more information about the books we chose this week!

The Watermelon Seed by Greg Pizzoli 

Sam & Dave Dig A Hole by Mac Burnett

Double Take! A New Look At Opposites by Susan Hood

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

Hiding Phil by Eric Barclay

#authorsaturday Mo Willems

Week in Review…

This was a busy week!  We wrapped up our first series of giveaways and shared a lot of great titles.  Click on the links below to learn more about the authors and illustrators from this week.

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7 Ate 9 by Tara Lazar

Illustrated by Ross MacDonald

 

 

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Super Narwhal and the Jelly Jolt by Ben Clanton

Chalk by Bill Thomson

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

 

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You Can’t Take a Ballon Into the Metropolitan Museum by Jacqueline Preiss Weitzman

Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser

 

 

 

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When Life Gives you OJ by Erica S. Perl

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner

Olga and the Smelly Thing From Nowhere by Elise Gravel

 

 

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The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig

Illustrated by Patrice Barton

 

 

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Red Car, Red Bus by Susan Steggall

 

 

 

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The Gingerbread Man series by Laura Murray

Illustrated by Mike Lowery

 

 

 

Week in Review


This week we shared books about art, history, science and had our first book giveaway! See below for a review of the books we are loving this week! Also, follow us on Instagram and/or Twitter @storymamas to find out why we loved these books! You can also click on the link for each book to find more about the authors and illustrators!

Louise Loves Art by Kelly Light

Greenglass House by Kate Milford and Jaime Zollars 

This Book Thinks Your a Scientist by London Science Museum and Harriet Russell 

The Legend of Old Abe A Civil War Eagle by Kathy-jo Wargin and Laurie Caple

Today by Julie Morstad

What Will I Be by Nicola Davies and Marc Boutavant

Rump by Liesl Shurtliff

Frazzled by Booki Vivat

Ordinary People Change the World series by Brad Meltzer and Christopher Eliopoulos

 

Moo Moo, Monsters & Middle Grade Books!

This is the week in review! Check out @storymamas on Instagram and Twitter to learn more about our picks this week! week 3 story mamas review

Fish in a Tree

Moo Moo in a Tutu
Wolfe the Bunny
The Lion Inside
My Teacher is a Monster
Tek- The Modern Cave Boy
#authorsaturday Elise Gravel

Week in Review

#storymamasbookaday #authorsaturday

Here are the books we recommended this week. Also, follow us on Instagram and/or Twitter @storymamas to find out why we loved these books!

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A Sick Day for Amos McGee – Philip C. Stead

https://instagram.com/p/BUE5elaBqwv/

Pass It On Sophy Henn
Zoe’s Rescue School – The Puzzled Penguin
Counting Crows – Kathi Appelt
The Donut Chef – Bob Staake
Happy Dreamer – Peter Reynolds
# authorsaturday – Jennifer L. Holm

Two Weeks in Review…

We’ve shared the following books to start up our newest hashtag #storymamasbookaday


I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld

Curious George Goes to the Bookstore by Margret & H.A. Rey’s

El Perro con Sombrerro by Derek Taylor Kent and Jed Henry

Adopt a Glurb by Elise Gravel

Dragons Love Tacos 2 The Sequel by Adam Rubinstein and Dan Salmieri

Knuffle Bunny by Mo Willems

Real Friends by Shannon Hale and Leuyen Pham

Good News, Bad News; Look; Ah Ha; Frog and Fly by Jeff Mack

The Airport Book by Lisa Brown

Mouse Makes Words by Kathryn Heling, Deborah Hembrook and Patrick Joseph

Red Riding Hood, Superhero by Otis Frampton; Ninja-rella by Joey Comeau and Omar Lozano; Snow White and the Seven Robots by Louise Simonson and Jimena Sanchez; Super Billy Goats Gruff by Sean Tulien and Fern Cano

Mine by Jeff Mack

Little Red Gliding Hood by Tara Lazar and Troy Cummings

Strictly No Elephants by Lisa Mantchev and Taeeun Yoo

Mother Bruce, Hotel Bruce and Be Quiet by Ryan T. Higgins

#storymamasbookaday

It’s been two weeks Stories About Stories has been sharing a book a day on Instagram and Twitter @storymamas. If you aren’t already following make sure you do! We hope you’ve enjoyed hearing about some of the books we are reading and loving right now.

What is one book you didn’t know about before that you’re excited to read with your children or your students?

I Wish You More

Here is the journey of how the book  I Wish You More  by Tom Lichtenheld and Amy Krouse Rosenthal, came into my life and has stayed in my heart. If you haven’t read it, please put it on your shelfie (a term I use for my mental shelf of books I want to read).

I first heard about the book on the Nerdy Book Club blog in May of 2015. As soon as I read that post I knew I had to get a copy and read it immediately.

Life got in the way for the next two weeks and then I was gifted the book for my birthday from co-blogger Ashley and another friend. I read the book for the first time to my son, who was then about 9 months. He sat there on my lap quietly I read each brilliant page aloud. As I turned to see what was next the tears started to form. “I wish you more umbrella than rain”. The tears came slow and steady as each page made me feel like I wanted to be the best person I can be, for myself and my son. After I finished the book I gave him a big hug and said “ I wish you more hugs than ughs”

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As much as I love this book, I have to admit I can’t read it everyday, it would be one when I was looking for hope, love or inspiration.

Almost two years later, on the night I get home from the hospital after having my second son, comes the death of Amy Krouse Rosenthal. A true loss to the children’s literature world. I knew that for our first night as a family of 4 we would have to read  I Wish You More.  Having both boys on the couch next to me, again, tearing up as I read this book. “I wish you more can than knot”.

The book is simple yet makes so many wonderful emotions come through the page in both the words and illustrations. I hope you take the time to read it and let me know your favorite wish is from the book.

As we all have busy lives, in the words of Tom Lichtenheld and the late, great Amy Krouse Rosenthal “I wish you more pause than fast forward”