Early Chapter Book Favs

Growing up, I do not remember there being a lot of options for chapter books when I first started reading. I remember reading Frog and Toad, and Amelia Bedelia before I got into “real” chapter books that didn’t have any pictures. As I am now reading similar books to my four year old daughter, I have learned just how much has changed. There are so many wonderful options available, but I’ve narrowed down some of our favorites that would be just right for someone beginning to read chapter books, or like in our case, a good book for an adult to read at bedtime. The chapters are shorter, the font is bigger, and there are pictures to help tell the story. Last week I talked about the Dory Fantasmagory series on Instagram for #storymamasbookaday, and here are some others in addition.  Happy reading!

 

Mercy Watson series by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van DusenIMG_9061

This series tells the adventures of a pig named Mercy Watson, and her human owners/parents, Mr. and Mrs. Watson. Mercy has a love of buttered toast and seems to get herself into a funny pickle in every book. There are six total books in the series, and they have colorful illustrations on almost every page.

 

 

Tales from Deckawoo Drive series by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Chris Van DusenIMG_9064

This is a spinoff series of Mercy Watson. It tells the stories of the other people that the reader was introduced to in the original series, such as Leroy Ninker and Baby Lincoln. Not to worry, the beloved Mercy Watson makes appearances in all of the books. There are currently three books published in the series, with the fourth coming out in October.

 

 

The Chicken Squad series by Doreen Cronin, illustrated by Kevin Cornellimg_9060.jpg

This is a spin-off series from one of Cronin’s other series, The Trouble with Chickens. There are four chicks that make up the Chicken Squad, and despite being adorable and small, they are brave crime fighters, solving mysteries. These little chicks will keep you laughing throughout. The fifth book in this series comes out in November.

 

 

The Princess in Black series By Shannon Hale and Dean Hale, illustrated by LeUyen PhamIMG_9065

This series tells the story of frilly and pink Princess Magnolia, who leads a double life as the Princess in Black. Her alter ego uses trap doors, wears a black ensemble to keep her in disguise, and bravely fights monsters. The character is a good, strong female role model for girls, and the illustrations truly make the story come to life. There are currently four books in the series, with the fifth coming out in early September.

 

Are there any early series that are favorites in your house? Stay tuned for more recommendations!

 

 

 

Meet Margaret Dilloway!

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3 ?s about Momotaro Xander and the Lost Island of Monsters

What three words would you use to describe your book?

Imagination, friendship, adventure

What made you decide to change gears and write middle grade books?

I guess it wasn’t so much as I decided to write middle grade books as it was that I had a specific idea, and the best way to execute that idea was through writing a middle grade book. It was a pretty big learning curve for me, with many drafts over several years, but a lot of fun! I worked on it in between other projects.

How did you get the ideas for Momotaro?  I know you visited Japan for your research, but how did you arrive at the Japanese fantasy genre?

I’m half Japanese and I had a Japanese board book about Momotaro that my mom would read (translate) to me. I thought the story could be compelling for Western audiences and I wanted to find a way to present it to them.

Xander’s biracial because I am, and I didn’t read about any biracial characters while I was growing up.  I also thought it’d be a way for a Western audience to relate to the Japanese cultural stuff– Xander’s a bit of an outsider and raised in the West, as well. I was also raised in San Diego, with only my mother as the link to the entire Japanese culture.

Additionally, I wanted to explore some ideas about being mixed race, and also what that would mean for a mythological hero that was always the same race. Will his powers be weaker? Stronger? Different? How does his mother’s heritage affect him?  It parallels ideas and fears people have in the real world about races and cultures intermingling. And, I wanted to leave open the possibility that Xander’s mother’s myths would cross-pollinate with the Japanese myths.

 

3 ?s about You

If you weren’t a writer, what would you want to be and why?

A detective, because I observe things and make connections other people commonly do not, and I am extremely nosy!

What is one book that has stuck with you since you’ve read it?

That is like the #1 Impossible Question for writers! I will say THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME INDIAN by Sherman Alexie because after I read it, I had a breakthrough about Momotaro.

What is one item in your fridge that tells us about you?

The big ol’ jar of coffee.

 

Follow Margaret Dilloway on Twitter @mdilloway or on Instagram @margaretdilloway.

You can learn more about her and her other books by visiting www.margaretdilloway.com

 

#storymamassummerselections

Check out our @storymamas Instagram and Twitter feeds for more information about the books we chose this week!

The Watermelon Seed by Greg Pizzoli 

Sam & Dave Dig A Hole by Mac Burnett

Double Take! A New Look At Opposites by Susan Hood

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

Hiding Phil by Eric Barclay

#authorsaturday Mo Willems

Week in Review…

This was a busy week!  We wrapped up our first series of giveaways and shared a lot of great titles.  Click on the links below to learn more about the authors and illustrators from this week.

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7 Ate 9 by Tara Lazar

Illustrated by Ross MacDonald

 

 

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Super Narwhal and the Jelly Jolt by Ben Clanton

Chalk by Bill Thomson

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

 

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You Can’t Take a Ballon Into the Metropolitan Museum by Jacqueline Preiss Weitzman

Illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser

 

 

 

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When Life Gives you OJ by Erica S. Perl

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner

Olga and the Smelly Thing From Nowhere by Elise Gravel

 

 

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The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig

Illustrated by Patrice Barton

 

 

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Red Car, Red Bus by Susan Steggall

 

 

 

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The Gingerbread Man series by Laura Murray

Illustrated by Mike Lowery

 

 

 

Week in Review


This week we shared books about art, history, science and had our first book giveaway! See below for a review of the books we are loving this week! Also, follow us on Instagram and/or Twitter @storymamas to find out why we loved these books! You can also click on the link for each book to find more about the authors and illustrators!

Louise Loves Art by Kelly Light

Greenglass House by Kate Milford and Jaime Zollars 

This Book Thinks Your a Scientist by London Science Museum and Harriet Russell 

The Legend of Old Abe A Civil War Eagle by Kathy-jo Wargin and Laurie Caple

Today by Julie Morstad

What Will I Be by Nicola Davies and Marc Boutavant

Rump by Liesl Shurtliff

Frazzled by Booki Vivat

Ordinary People Change the World series by Brad Meltzer and Christopher Eliopoulos

 

Moo Moo, Monsters & Middle Grade Books!

This is the week in review! Check out @storymamas on Instagram and Twitter to learn more about our picks this week! week 3 story mamas review

Fish in a Tree

Moo Moo in a Tutu
Wolfe the Bunny
The Lion Inside
My Teacher is a Monster
Tek- The Modern Cave Boy
#authorsaturday Elise Gravel

Week in Review

#storymamasbookaday #authorsaturday

Here are the books we recommended this week. Also, follow us on Instagram and/or Twitter @storymamas to find out why we loved these books!

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A Sick Day for Amos McGee – Philip C. Stead

https://instagram.com/p/BUE5elaBqwv/

Pass It On Sophy Henn
Zoe’s Rescue School – The Puzzled Penguin
Counting Crows – Kathi Appelt
The Donut Chef – Bob Staake
Happy Dreamer – Peter Reynolds
# authorsaturday – Jennifer L. Holm

Two Weeks in Review…

We’ve shared the following books to start up our newest hashtag #storymamasbookaday


I Wish You More by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Tom Lichtenheld

Curious George Goes to the Bookstore by Margret & H.A. Rey’s

El Perro con Sombrerro by Derek Taylor Kent and Jed Henry

Adopt a Glurb by Elise Gravel

Dragons Love Tacos 2 The Sequel by Adam Rubinstein and Dan Salmieri

Knuffle Bunny by Mo Willems

Real Friends by Shannon Hale and Leuyen Pham

Good News, Bad News; Look; Ah Ha; Frog and Fly by Jeff Mack

The Airport Book by Lisa Brown

Mouse Makes Words by Kathryn Heling, Deborah Hembrook and Patrick Joseph

Red Riding Hood, Superhero by Otis Frampton; Ninja-rella by Joey Comeau and Omar Lozano; Snow White and the Seven Robots by Louise Simonson and Jimena Sanchez; Super Billy Goats Gruff by Sean Tulien and Fern Cano

Mine by Jeff Mack

Little Red Gliding Hood by Tara Lazar and Troy Cummings

Strictly No Elephants by Lisa Mantchev and Taeeun Yoo

Mother Bruce, Hotel Bruce and Be Quiet by Ryan T. Higgins

I Wish You More

Here is the journey of how the book  I Wish You More  by Tom Lichtenheld and Amy Krouse Rosenthal, came into my life and has stayed in my heart. If you haven’t read it, please put it on your shelfie (a term I use for my mental shelf of books I want to read).

I first heard about the book on the Nerdy Book Club blog in May of 2015. As soon as I read that post I knew I had to get a copy and read it immediately.

Life got in the way for the next two weeks and then I was gifted the book for my birthday from co-blogger Ashley and another friend. I read the book for the first time to my son, who was then about 9 months. He sat there on my lap quietly I read each brilliant page aloud. As I turned to see what was next the tears started to form. “I wish you more umbrella than rain”. The tears came slow and steady as each page made me feel like I wanted to be the best person I can be, for myself and my son. After I finished the book I gave him a big hug and said “ I wish you more hugs than ughs”

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As much as I love this book, I have to admit I can’t read it everyday, it would be one when I was looking for hope, love or inspiration.

Almost two years later, on the night I get home from the hospital after having my second son, comes the death of Amy Krouse Rosenthal. A true loss to the children’s literature world. I knew that for our first night as a family of 4 we would have to read  I Wish You More.  Having both boys on the couch next to me, again, tearing up as I read this book. “I wish you more can than knot”.

The book is simple yet makes so many wonderful emotions come through the page in both the words and illustrations. I hope you take the time to read it and let me know your favorite wish is from the book.

As we all have busy lives, in the words of Tom Lichtenheld and the late, great Amy Krouse Rosenthal “I wish you more pause than fast forward”

 

Books That are Better Than TV…

Where’s Waldo…remember this awesome book as a kid?

A few months ago my nieces, nephews and my kids were altogether. This doesn’t happen often so it was a treat to spend time together. My favorite parts of the day where when we would wind down and read together. Since my kids are the youngest, many of my nieces and nephews took turns reading to my boys. We brought out our old copies of the Where’s Waldo series, the ones my sister and I would sit around for hours trying to find Waldo, the Wizard and all the missing items. These types of interactive books are awesome! Pop-up books have always been a favorite in my house since my three year old was small enough to interact with books. He still loves the pop-up books but now there are so many books that go beyond those classics; they give you something to explore, problem solve and think about it in a new way. Here are a few of my favorite interactive books:

Let’s Play by Herve Tullet (or any of his books)

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The Odd One Out, Where’s the Pair and Where Did they Go? by Britta Teckentrup

Move by Lolly Hopwood and Yoyo Kusters

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Spot It! by Delphine Chedru

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Who Done It? and Who What Where? by  Olivier Tallec

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Where’s Walrus and Where’s Walrus & Penguin by Stephen Savage

Before After by Matthias Arégui and Anne-Margot Ramstein
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This is Not a Book by Jean Jullien

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One Thousand Things: learn your first words with Little Mouse by Anna Kovecses

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